Mia and Nattie: One Great Team by Marlene M. Bell

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Mia and Nattie teach little ones that it is ok to be different, and we all have a purpose.

I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

Nattie’s calming magic happened! Grandma’s favorite sheep began to eat the grass.

Mia and Nattie by Marlene M. Bell – pg 21

Book Cover Mia and Nattie: One Great Team by Marlene M. Bell

Marlene M. Bell is a sheep breeder living in East Texas. She also contributes photographs to many livestock magazines.

Marlene is an award-winning author with her Annalisse mystery series. The series consists of 3 books: Stolen ObsessionSpent Identity, and Scattered Legacy.

Her first children’s picture book is Mia and Nattie: One Great Teambased on actual events from the Bell’s ranch, was published in October 2020.

Mia and Nattie -Summary

Nattie, the lamb, was smaller and weaker than the other lambs and abandoned by her mother. Little Mia brought her into the house and nurtured her with bottled milk.

Even though Nattie soon grew too big to stay in the house, she was still smaller than the other sheep and couldn’t join the rest of the flock.

Mia’s grandmother wants to sell Nattie, but Mia is determined to find a purpose for Nattie so that she can stay.

My take on Mia and Nattie

It is hard to be different

Children who are different are often teased and bullied. It leads to low self-esteem and confidence issues. Children who are different often feel they are worth less than others.

Also Read:  Red Velvet and Anemones by M.M. Ward

In Mia and Nattie, we are introduced to a lamb that is different.

Mia could see that Nattie’s mouth was a little crooked. And her legs were a bit shorter than usual, and one horn was too straight like a unicorn’s horn. But Mia thought Nattie was perfect.

 Mia and Nattie by Marlene M. Bell – pg 4

Because Nattie is so small, she can’t live with the flock or raise babies. It seems as if Nattie has no value or purpose. But through the story of Nattie, children can learn that every person is valuable, and we all have a purpose.

Children will understand that it is ok to be different, and it doesn’t make them less worthy than anybody else.

Love and acceptance

The book teaches children about the love and relationships between us and animals and how they add value to our lives. We experience unconditional love and acceptance from animals. And they will understand that the value of relationships is not in what a person can do for us, but from who we are and the experiences we share.

Should you get Mia and Nattie for your child?

Mia and Nattie: One Great Team tells the simple story of a little lamb who is different. But Mia loves her, even if Nattie doesn’t have a specific purpose.

Children will enjoy the simple and colourful illustrations by Grace Sandford. The book is perfect to read aloud to young children, and early readers will enjoy reading it by themselves.

Also Read:  A Time for Violence: Stories with an Edge

Your child will also enjoy Turtle Crossing, about a turtle who didn’t want to move with his parents. Or Imagine That: The Magic of the Mysterious Lights, which teach them about the power of visualisation.

The only way we can change how people who are different are treated is by educating our children. How can you use this book as a conversation starter to teach your children about diversity? We would love to hear from you. Please share with us in the comments?

Follow Marlene M. Bell

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Hi! I am Susan

Welcome to my adventure

Why Read or Rot?

I have started reading at the age of four. I can remember how I often read under the covers with a flashlight when I was supposed to sleep.

During my early school years, we visited the library once a week. I couldn’t pick out my new book fast enough! By the end of the period, I would have finished it already, leaving me with nothing to read for the rest of the week!

Growing up, Fridays was the highlight of my week. Dad would pack the whole family into the car, and off we go! You guessed right – to the library! We were a family of readers.

In my adult years, I’ve developed a variety of interests like technology, photography, gardening and even writing. But reading was and will always be a part of my life!

Reading for me is like breathing. If I cannot read, my soul will quietly rot away

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