Lizzie’s Dream Journal by Charlie King

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Lizzie’s Dream Journal shows how journalling can help us to deal with our emotions after we’ve experienced loss or trauma.

I've received an advance readers copy for free and  I am leaving this review voluntarily.

It wasn’t until she went upstairs to her room that she checked the journal out. The padded leather cover around the book felt nice to touch. “If you can write it, dream it,” read the raised words on the front cover.

CAAB Publishing. Lizzie’s Dream Journal Formatted (Kindle Locations 194-196). Kindle Edition.

Book cover of Lizzie's Dream Journal by Charlie King.

Charlie King lives in London and has started writing at an early age. He considers writing to be a hobby.

On his blog, Charlie reviews books, TV shows and films. He also writes satirical articles and his observations of his life as an author. He works as a legal assistant, and when he is not writing, he relaxes by watching TV or playing video games.

Charlie published his first book in 2017. Lizzie’s Dream Journal is his third book, published in December 2020.

Lizzie’s Dream Journal – Summary

The loss of her father shakes Lizzie. But even more, she is ashamed. Her Dynamic Dad hero has fallen from grace. He tripped and fell from a building, and the police found him with a rat mask. The burglars used the same maks in the robbery. Her cop father turned out to be a criminal.

At school, she doesn’t tell anyone what happened to her dad and resent her teachers treating her differently from the other children. She faces ongoing bullying by three other girls. One of them is the sister of her only friend, Sophie. But Sophie doesn’t stand up for her, which is why she breaks up their friendship.

The magic journal

Lizzie’s mom gets her a journal to write anything she wants, as suggested by a school counsellor. But it turns out to be a magic journal, as everything Sophie writes in her journal happens in her dreams. 

Collage of a girl, a bear standing, a teddy bear, a rat, and a dream journal

Through her dreams and the stories she writes in her magic journal, Lizzie starts to deal with the loss of her dad, her sense of betrayal in real life and her dreams and the bullying she experiences at school. She comes out stronger, renews her friendship with Sophie, and puts the bullies in their place.

My take on Lizzie’s Dream Journal

Loss and betrayal

Lizzie’s Dream Diary addresses many issues that children face in today’s world. The main problem for Lizzie is the loss of her dad. She feels betrayed because he didn’t die a hero’s death – he fell off a building and turned out to be a criminal. It seems as if he was part of the burglary that took place. But even more, the shame she feels ashamed because of the way he died. 

Also Read:  Blood Dragon by Freddie P Peters

She also feels betrayed by Sophie for not standing up for her against her sister and her friends, by Rodford in her dreams, and by Mr Ridgeley (the teacher she likes the most.)

Bullying

Bullying is an issue that many children face. Not only daily at school but due to technological advances also online. We have to realise that bullying is not only physical, and the unseen mental scars can often be much worse. Calling children ugly names, belittling, and mocking them can be devastating for a young child still establishing her identity and is often harder to spot than physical bullying. 

Through her dreams and the stories in her journal, Lizzie faces and overcomes many challenges, which helps her deal with issues in her real life. Her biggest accomplishment is overcoming fear, which is a bully’s biggest weapon.

Symbolism

The author uses various symbols throughout the narrative. In her dreams, Rodford symbolises the betrayal Lizzie feels, and Dr Ofdor represents the many challenges she faces. Ridgeley (named after her favourite teacher) stands for her mother and brother, the people she relies on to support her. It is ironic that Ridgeley the rat is always there for Lizzie in her dreams, but in real life, Mr Ridgeley, her teachers betrayed her.

Should you get Lizzie’s Dream Journal for your child?

I recommend Lizzie’s Dream Journal, a fantasy story for middle graders. It deals with many issues these age groups face at school and in life. Not only will they be able to associate with the story and characters, but through Lizzie’s stories and dreams, they can find ways to deal with their challenges. Many children will enjoy having a journal to write in, and it can even lead to the birth of a new author.

Another book you can consider reading with your child is Twisty Tales, Vol. 1. Because we all know life is hard, and humour often saves the day. Read this collection of funny stories to brighten up your reading time with your child.

Children faces many challenges at school, like teasing and bullying at school. Or feeling neglected at home after the birth of a new baby. They can also suffer emotionally if they feel they are not living up to their parent’s expectations. And these days the specific challenges due to the Covid-19 pandemic. One way to help them deal with this is through journalling. It gives them a way to express their feelings – either by just writing it down, or in the form of stories. It can be beneficial for parents too. Any notebook will do, but one with a beautiful cover might entice them to write more. We would love to hear from you. Did you get your child (and yourself) a journal? If you gained any benefit from journaling, please share with us in the comments?

Also Read:  Twisty Tales, Vol 1 by F.J. Beerling and V.A. Bryce

Follow Charlie King

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Hi! I am Susan

Welcome to my adventure

Why Read or Rot?

I have started reading at the age of four. I can remember how I often read under the covers with a flashlight when I was supposed to sleep.

During my early school years, we visited the library once a week. I couldn’t pick out my new book fast enough! By the end of the period, I would have finished it already, leaving me with nothing to read for the rest of the week!

Growing up, Fridays was the highlight of my week. Dad would pack the whole family into the car, and off we go! You guessed right – to the library! We were a family of readers.

In my adult years, I’ve developed a variety of interests like technology, photography, gardening and even writing. But reading was and will always be a part of my life!

Reading for me is like breathing. If I cannot read, my soul will quietly rot away

Hi! I am Susan

Welcome to my adventure

Why Read or Rot?

I have started reading at the age of four. I can remember how I often read under the covers with a flashlight when I was supposed to sleep.

During my early school years, we visited the library once a week. I couldn’t pick out my new book fast enough! By the end of the period, I would have finished it already, leaving me with nothing to read for the rest of the week!

Growing up, Fridays was the highlight of my week. Dad would pack the whole family into the car, and off we go! You guessed right – to the library! We were a family of readers.

In my adult years, I’ve developed a variety of interests like technology, photography, gardening and even writing. But reading was and will always be a part of my life!

Reading for me is like breathing. If I cannot read, my soul will quietly rot away

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